Fox Control

Wild foxes also occasionally attack and kill livestock, especially chickens, ducks, game birds, and their eggs. Less commonly, they may attack young lambs, rabbits, and other small domestic animals and pets — especially if they are left unprotected at night. Even more rarely, foxes may damage food or feed crops; but what little damage they do to crops probably is more than offset by their helping to control smaller animals and insects that are more destructive.

Fox trapping or fox removal may also be necessary, especially where fox populations are especially high, natural food sources scarce, and fox under increased pressure to find food.

Fox trapping and removal is also needed when a fox is suspected of being rabid or otherwise ill.

In addition, foxes who have become a little too comfortable around people also should be trapped and removed because they may attack when unintentionally threatened by humans (especially small children, who may try to pet them).

The most common type of trap used for both coyote fox is the leghold. This includes both the COIL and the LONG SPRING design. These traps are used many ways.

Foxes are members of the family Canidae (or Canines), the same family that includes dogs, wolves, and coyote. Their intelligence and agility make fox among the most adaptable of wild animals, common in Malaysia. These same characteristics also make fox hard to control.

Like all canines, fox are predators by nature. They hunt and kill smaller animals for food. But they're also opportunistic feeders who will eat carrion, grasses, grains, fruits, and other foods.As its natural habitat continues to shrink, the fox has also adapted quite well to rummaging through human garbage, which probably provides the bulk of their diet in and around urban areas.

 
Fox as nuisance wildlife
 
Healthy foxes in the wild are an important part of the natural ecosystem. Because of diminishing habitat and increasing numbers, however, foxes living in or close to human communities sometimes create a nuisance or health hazard to people, domestic pets, and livestock.

Foxes are vulnerable to and can transmit a number of serious zoonotic diseases including rabies, mange, canine distemper, parvo enteritis, roundworms, and other endoparasites. They also may be involved in the transmission of arboviral diseases vectored by fleas, ticks, and other external parasites that commonly infest wild animals.

Wild foxes also occasionally attack and kill livestock, especially chickens, ducks, game birds, and their eggs. Less commonly, they may attack young lambs, rabbits, and other small domestic animals and pets — especially if they are left unprotected at night. Even more rarely, foxes may damage food or feed crops; but what little damage they do to crops probably is more than offset by their helping to control smaller animals and insects that are more destructive.
 
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